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Before leaving office, Missouri governor signs revenge porn law

On Friday, Missouri governor Eric Greitens officially quit his position, but not before approving 77 new laws. Among those, one criminalizes “nonconsensual dissemination of private sexual images.” Earlier this year in January, a woman accused the governor of blackmailing her after a sexual encounter that took place in 2015.

The woman claimed that the married Republican taped her hands, blindfolded her, took a nonconsensual nude photo of her, and threatened to distribute the image everywhere if she ever mentioned his name. Greitens admitted to having the affair, but firmly denied that he had committed any crime in the process.

While this allegation was brought upon the governor, it wasn’t what caused him to ultimately leave office. In April, Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley announced that his team came across evidence where Greitens took a donor lost from a charity he founded without first getting permission. He then proceeded to use the list in his own political fundraising.

Greitens was forced to resign as part of his deal with a prosecutor to drop the felony charge against him in this particular case. In addition, first-degree Delong invasion of privacy charges were brought against him as well.

Hamza Khalid

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